(416) 663-9649 info@minorsurgery.ca

OUR SERVICES

At CFMS we treat all benign and malignant skin lesions.

Ask about our “tiny scar” techniques.

Sebaceous Cysts

What are Sebaceous Cysts?

Sebaceous Cysts are benign growths originating from the oil glands located within our skin. They form due to a blockage (cause often unknown) in the outlet of a sebaceous gland which normally allows the sebaceous material (oils) produced by that gland to surface onto the skin, So in essence, a sebaceous cysts is a blocked oil gland in the skin that is enlarging as it produces more and more sebaceous material that cannot be emitted onto the skin surface sue to the blocked oulet.

Sebaceous cysts can occur on any body part that has sebaceous glands. Common locations include the extremities, trunk, back, abdomen, face, neck, and scalp.

Sebaceous cysts often cause no symptoms, especially if they are small. As they enlarge, they may become tender due to stretching of the overlying skin or if external pressure is applied to them such as lying down on a sebaceous cyst on the back. Sebaceous cysts can sometime become infected which results in a spontaneous tenderness to develop in the cyst along with redness and heat. An infected sebaceous cyst may need to be treated using antibiotics and/or a surgical drainage procedure. The cyst will then usually need to be formally excised at a later date once the infection has been resolved for at least several weeks.

At CFMS, sebaceous cysts are treated by direct surgical excision or suction liposuction under local anesthesia. Direct surgical excision involves making an incision directly over the cyst, extracting the lipoma surgically and then stitching the skin. At CFMS we offer a “mini-scar” technique which uses a very minimal incision to remove the cyst and therefore leaves a much smaller scar. When inquiring about sebaceous cyst excision at CFMS, ask about our “mini-scar” technique.

Sebaceous Cysts

What are Sebaceous Cysts?

Sebaceous Cysts are benign growths originating from the oil glands located within our skin. They form due to a blockage (cause often unknown) in the outlet of a sebaceous gland which normally allows the sebaceous material (oils) produced by that gland to surface onto the skin, So in essence, a sebaceous cysts is a blocked oil gland in the skin that is enlarging as it produces more and more sebaceous material that cannot be emitted onto the skin surface sue to the blocked oulet.

Sebaceous cysts can occur on any body part that has sebaceous glands. Common locations include the extremities, trunk, back, abdomen, face, neck, and scalp.

Sebaceous cysts often cause no symptoms, especially if they are small. As they enlarge, they may become tender due to stretching of the overlying skin or if external pressure is applied to them such as lying down on a sebaceous cyst on the back. Sebaceous cysts can sometime become infected which results in a spontaneous tenderness to develop in the cyst along with redness and heat. An infected sebaceous cyst may need to be treated using antibiotics and/or a surgical drainage procedure. The cyst will then usually need to be formally excised at a later date once the infection has been resolved for at least several weeks.

At CFMS, sebaceous cysts are treated by direct surgical excision or suction liposuction under local anesthesia. Direct surgical excision involves making an incision directly over the cyst, extracting the lipoma surgically and then stitching the skin. At CFMS we offer a “mini-scar” technique which uses a very minimal incision to remove the cyst and therefore leaves a much smaller scar. When inquiring about sebaceous cyst excision at CFMS, ask about our “mini-scar” technique.

Moles / Nevi / Beauty Marks

What are Moles, Nevi or Beauty Marks?

These are harmless brown, tan, pink or sometimes blue spots that can anywhere on the skin. They may grow over time and their appearance may slightly change. Some are present from birth, while others may develop later in life.

These moles may change in response to hormonal fluctuations, but a doctor should check any changing or new mole to ensure there are no signs of skin cancer.

Moles, Nevi or Beauty Marks Removal Procedure

Benign moles can be left alone, or can be removed for cosmetic reasons. Removal involves injecting local freezing into the area to begin with. There is some slight pain with this injection, but after the freezing has taken the procedure is completely painless.

After Moles, Nevi or Beauty Marks Removal

Depending on the features of the mole, once removal is completed the skin may be left to heal on its own or may be stitched. In either case a small bandage is applied and the area should be kept dry for 48 hours. Antibiotic ointment and a fresh bandage should be applied for 1-2 weeks after the procedure. If there are sutures, they are typically removed in 1-2 weeks.

Moles, Nevi or Beauty Marks Removal Mark

Unfortunately, there is no way to remove a mole without leaving a mark. Whether the area heals on its own, or is stitched, the mark is usually pink or red at the beginning. Over time, however, this fades into a fine light mark that is often hard to see at all. There are many scar products available to help improve scarring after mole removal and scars continue to fade for up to 18 months after the procedure.

Removal of harmless moles is not covered by OHIP.

Keloids

What are Keloids?

Keloids are best understood as an abnormal and undesirable variations in the way a person’s body heals a wound, cut, or even surgical incision. Usually, an individual will heal a cut with a scar that is more or less the same dimensions and shape as the cut itself with varying degrees of pigmentation and texture from person to person.

Keloids, on the other hand, are variations in healing and scarring in which the scar takes on what appears to be a life of its own growing far outside the dimensions of the wound that caused it. The keloid will be much larger, raised and pigmented that an ordinary scar and can be very cosmetically disfiguring.

One classic example of a keloid occurs after a simple ear piercing. A very large, nodular, and purple scar forms after a few months which can be many centimetres in size and be of extreme concern to the patients.

What causes Keloids?

Keloids are not tumours, they are our body’s own scar tissue which for genetic reason forms in an abundance and quantity that is undesirable. Certain ethnic groups, especially those with darker skin are more genetically prone to forming keloids, and certain body areas such as the earlobes, midline of chest, back and shoulders are more prone to form keloid scars.

It is not uncommon for a person who has healed normally their entire life to then form a keloid from a cut or incision that occurs in one of these keloid-prone body areas.

How we treat Keloids?

Keloids are difficult to treat because they are the result of the patient’s body healing a wound in that area the way it is genetically programmed to do so. As such, if a cut or piercing leads to a keloid, then the surgery done to remove the keloid will very often also heal with a keloid because medical science has not yet figured out a way to “trick” the patient’s system into healing more normally. The recurrence rate for keloids, even with the best treatments is therefore very high.

At CFMS we generally treat keloids with a combination of surgical removal and follow-up cortisone injections. While many treatments are highly successful, there is always a strong and unpredictable chance of recurrence for any patient.

Lipomas

What are Lipomas?

Lipomas are benign growths originating from fat cells. They are essentially a benign growth of fat (adipose) tissue. It is very rare for a lipoma to change from benign to malignant.

Lipomas can occur on any body part that has a fat layer. Common locations include the extremities, trunk, back, abdomen and even the forehead.

Most lipomas cause no symptoms although as they grow they can become somewhat symptomatic as they stretch the overlying skin or press on a local nerve or if they occur in an area such as the back where pressure can be applied to them externally such as when lying on them. In many cases lipomas cause no symptoms but patients request their removal for aesthetic reasons as they begin to become more and more noticeable with an increase in size.

At CFMS, lipomas are treated by either direct surgical excision or suction liposuction under local anesthesia. Direct surgical excision involves making an incision directly over the lipoma, extracting the lipoma surgically and then stitching the skin. The incision size is generally about 1/2 – 2/3 of the size of the lipoma itself but the incision may need to be made larger for lipomas that are more adherent to surrounding tissues and therefore more difficult to remove. Incisions always leave a scar so at CFMS we make it a top priority to keep the incision size as small as possible. Liposuction involves making a very small incision (about 1/2 cm in length) and using a suction device and cannula to break up the lipoma and vacuum it out. While incision size and, therefore scar size, are much smaller using liposuction, the completeness of lipoma removal is more difficult to ensure and therefore the recurrence rate is higher with liposuction than with the direct excision technique.

Ganglion Cysts

What are Ganglions?

Ganglions are fluid-filled cysts that arise from a a joint or tendon sheath. The most common body regions that ganglions arise from are the back and front of the wrist joint, the last joint in the digits, and the ankle and foot joints. Ganglions are an outpouching of the joint capsule or tendon sheath that is filled with the same fluid (synovial fluid) that normally is found within the joint or tendon sheath.

What causes Ganglions?

The precise cause of ganglions is unknown but they are likely the result of irritation within the joint space or tendon sheath due to previous trauma, overuse, or anatomical anomalies such as a lax ligament.

Are Ganglions dangerous?

Ganglions are benign and not dangerous but can become quite large and noticeable. Large ganglions can be tender and painful due to pressure within the cyst from fluid build-up or by pressing on an adjacent structure such as a nerve. Generally ganglions are treated when they are large and tender and painful or are cosmetically displeasing to the patient.

How we treat Ganglions?

At CFMS, ganglions are treated under local anesthesia either by aspiration (insertion of a needle into the cyst and removal of the fluid inside using a syringe), or excision. Aspiration is a simpler procedure but has a higher recurrence rate than excision. Excision involves removal of the cyst and a segment of the tendon sheath or joint capsule from which it arises. Excision has a lower recurrence rate than aspiration, however because the underlying cause of the ganglion (irritation or abnormality in the joint or tendon sheath) is not cured, ganglions have a significant recurrence rate even after surgical excision is performed. In general, recurrence for ganglion cysts is not infrequent regardless of the method of treatment and patients should be prepared for recurrence after ganglion treatment.

Skin Tags / Fibroepithelial Polyps

Skin tags are outgrowths of skin that can occur anywhere on the body but are particularly common on the neck, eyelids, armpits and groin areas. They are not dangerous and do not have the potential to turn into skin cancer. They are often associated with pregnancy and weight gain. Once formed, skin tags will not disappear naturally.

Skin tag removal can easily be performed in an office setting. A small amount of local anesthetic is injected into the area, at which point the procedure becomes painless. The tag is removed, and very rarely are stitches required. Typically, a small scab forms over the area that gradually lifts off. Once the scab is gone, there is typically a pink mark that gradually fades to a barely visible tiny white mark. Even very large skin tags can be removed without leaving much of a scar, as these large tags usually have a narrow base.

After removal, patients apply a small amount of antibiotic ointment to the area daily until the scab disappears. Bathing and activity may return to normal immediately after the procedure. Removal of skin tags is not covered by OHIP.

Warts / Verruca Vulgaris

What are Warts?

A virus known as the Human Papilloma Virus, or HPV causes warts. They can be found on any part of the body, but are often seen on the soles of the feet, where they are known as “plantar warts”.

There is no currently available “cure” for the virus that causes warts, making permanent clearance of them difficult in some cases. Warts can be spread from one person to another.

How we treat Warts?

Usually Dermatologists treat warts through a variety of nonsurgical methods. These methods include “freezing” them with liquid nitrogen or applying a medication to the affected areas. There are a number of over the counter treatments available for warts as well, however, these tend to work very slowly and often not at all.

In cases that are not responding to any of the above treatments, surgical removal may be an option. This is performed in the office as a minor procedure. The affected area is numbed by injecting a local anesthetic. This is the only part of the procedure involving any pain. After the area is frozen, the wart is removed and the skin is usually stitched to close the wound. The stitches remain in place for 1-2 weeks. The area is to be kept dry for 2 days after the procedure and then may be washed normally.

After Warts Treatment?

Wart removal through surgery will leave a scar. The scar usually fades over time into a fine white line; however, scarring may vary from one person to another. Even with surgical removal, the wart may return at a later date, as the virus causing the wart still remains in your system. Wart removal by surgery is not covered by OHIP.

Eyelid Xanthelasma / White or Yellow Areas on the Eyelids

All About Eyelid Xanthelasmas

Xanthelasmas are collections fat or cholesterol in the upper eyelids, lower eyelids, or both. They can be associated with having high cholesterol but this is not always the case. Lowering one’s cholesterol levels will not cause them to go away unfortunately.

Eyelid Xanthelasmas Removal Procedure

Xanthelasmas are harmless and can be left alone if desired. Surgical removal, however, is the only reliable treatment option to eliminate xanthalasmas. This can be done in the office.

In removing xanthelasmas, the area is injected with local freezing to begin with. A small amount of pain is felt during the injection, and then the procedure becomes completely painless. The white or yellow areas are removed, and typically some dissolving sutures are used to speed up healing. Some bruising and swelling of the eyelids may occur, but this goes away quickly.

After Eyelid Xanthelasmas Removal

Once the procedure is finished, a small amount of antibiotic ointment is applied to the area. We ask that you continue to apply the ointment until the stitches dissolve, which usually takes 7-10 days. The area should be kept dry for 48 hours, and then can be washed normally.

A subtle white scar that usually fades into a very fine line may occur after surgery. Occasionally xanthelasmas may redevelop over time.

Xanthelasma removal is not covered by OHIP.

Xanthelasmas

What are Xanthelasmas?

Xanthelasmas are deposits of cholesterol in the skin creating often unsightly yellow plaques. They most often occur in the upper and lower eyelids.

Xanthelasmas are harmless and only of aesthetic concern but it is important to ensure through your primary care physician that your cholesterol levels are not high. Lowering high cholesterol, however, will not cause xanthelasmas to resolve.

Xanthelasmas can be treated topically using agents such as TCA (trichloroacetic acid) or surgeicall by direct surgical excision.

At CFMS, xanthelasmas are treated by direct surgical excision . A scar is left behind that generally heals very well in the eyelid folds and the aesthetic benefit of the procedure generally far outweighs the presence of the scar created

Dermatofibromas

All About Dermatofibromas

Dermatofibromas are small, harmless lumps within the skin that are firm to the touch. They can occur in both men and women of all ages but are more commonly found on the arms and legs of young women. They can occasionally form after a minor scrape or prick but more often appear spontaneously. It is not uncommon to for them to slowly grow over time. Dermatofibromas can range in colour from pink to dark brown and can sometimes be tender or itchy.

Dermatofibromas Procedure

While dermatofibromas are harmless, they may be removed for cosmetic purposes or if they are found to be annoying. Surgical removal is by far the most reliable method to remove dermatofibromas. Removal begins with injecting local anesthetic into the area. Injection of the freezing is slightly painful, but there is no pain during the procedure once the freezing has taken. The dermatofibroma is removed and the skin is stitched together. Stitches are usually removed in 1-2 weeks. The area is to be kept dry for 48 hours and antibiotic ointment and a small bandage should be applied daily until stitch removal.

After Dermatofibromas Procedure

Removal of dermatofibromas will leave a scar that is typically pink or red at the beginning and gradually fades into a fine white line. Scarring usually continues to improve for up to 18 months after the procedure and can be helped along with a variety of scar products.

Dermatofibroma removal is not covered by OHIP.

Skin Cancers: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Carcinoma, Melanoma

Split Earlobes

What are Split Earlobes?

Split earlobes are elongations or complete splits of an earlobe piercing usually as a result of the use of heavier earrings. The elongation extends the piercing hole downwards towards the bottom of the earlobe ultimately leading to a complete split of the lobe over time. Many women who prefer the use of heavier earrings will experience the problem of partial then complete splitting of their earlobes and the problem usually occurs on both sides.

Split Earlobes correction Procedure

To correct a split earlobe, the skin in the area of the elongated or split piercing must be surgically removed under local anesthesia in order to create a surface that will heal together and close the split. Contrary to common misconception, it is not enough to simply stitch the area together. It is also important to understand that in repairing the split or elongated piercing, the entire piercing hole is closed meaning that a new piercing will need to be done adjacent to the site usually around 6 to 8 weeks later. Surgical techniques which have attempted to leave a normal sized piercing hole after surgery are unsuccessful and can create healing problems. The best technique is to close the piercing completely and re-pierce at the later date.

What we do for Split Earlobes correction?

At CFMS split earlobe correction is done under local anesthesia. The procedure is not insured by OHIP. Recovery time is minimal and you will have stitches that require removal approximately 10-14 days after the procedure.

If you have a Vision We will help you to choose the correct procedure.

Our Services

Choosing the correct procedure that addresses the patient’s individual needs is the most important step in attaining surgical outcomes that make patients thrilled.

If you like what we do and want to know more

N

Sebaceous Cysts

Sebaceous Cysts are benign growths originating from the oil glands located within our skin.

Moles / Nevi / Beauty Marks

These are harmless brown, tan, pink or sometimes blue spots that can anywhere on the skin. They may grow over time and their appearance may slightly change.

Keloids

Keloids are best understood as an abnormal and undesirable variations in the way a person’s body heals a wound, cut, or even surgical incision.

N

Lipomas

Lipomas are benign growths originating from fat cells. They are essentially a benign growth of fat (adipose) tissue. It is very rare for a lipoma to change from benign to malignant.

N

Ganglion Cysts

Ganglions are fluid-filled cysts that arise from a a joint or tendon sheath. The most common body regions that ganglions arise from are the back and front of the wrist joint, the last joint in the digits, and the ankle and foot joints.

N

Skin Tags

Skin tags are outgrowths of skin that can occur anywhere on the body but are particularly common on the neck, eyelids, armpits and groin areas. They are not dangerous and do not have the potential to turn into skin cancer.

N

Warts / Verruca Vulgaris

A virus known as the Human Papilloma Virus, or HPV causes warts. They can be found on any part of the body, but are often seen on the soles of the feet, where they are known as “plantar warts”.

Eyelid Xanthelasma / White or Yellow Areas on the Eyelids

Xanthelasmas are collections fat or cholesterol in the upper eyelids, lower eyelids, or both. They can be associated with having high cholesterol but this is not always the case.

Xanthelasmas

Xanthelasmas are deposits of cholesterol in the skin creating often unsightly yellow plaques. They most often occur in the upper and lower eyelids.

Dermatofibromas

Dermatofibromas are small, harmless lumps within the skin that are firm to the touch. They can occur in both men and women of all ages but are more commonly found on the arms and legs of young women.

N

Skin Cancers: Basal Cell Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Carcinoma, Melanoma

Split Earlobes

Split earlobes are elongations or complete splits of an earlobe piercing usually as a result of the use of heavier earrings. The elongation extends the piercing hole downwards towards the bottom of the earlobe ultimately leading to a complete split of the lobe over time.

5109 Steeles Avenue West – Unit 300, Toronto, ON, CA, M9L 2Y8
info@minorsurgery.ca
(416) 663-9649
(416) 663-7407